Stuttering in adult

Duration: 7min 20sec Views: 719 Submitted: 03.07.2020
Category: Fingering
Stuttering is a speech disorder. People who stutter may repeat sounds, syllables, or words, or they may prolong sounds. There may also be interruptions to the normal flow of speech, known as blocks, along with unusual expressions or movements. Stuttering affects more than 70 million people worldwide, including more than 3 million people in the United States. It is more common among men than women.

How to stop or reduce a stutter

Adult Stuttering and Stammering (Dysfluency) - icommunicate therapy

It is common to see young children stutter as they are developing their language abilities. It is uncommon to see adults develop a stutter out of the blue, but it does happen. Referred to as acquired or late onset stuttering, it can develop for multiple reasons. This is the most common form of stuttering found in adults. This is caused by a traumatic event such as a stroke or other brain injury. After this injury a speech disorder may be present for just a few hours or can go on for a longer period.

For Adults

With a stutter, there is disruption to the fluency of our speech. Although stutters are somewhat obvious, an SLT will still perform an assessment to evaluate the speech problem properly. These disfluencies occur more often in persons who stutter than they do in the general population. Blocked is when the mouth is positioned to say a sound, sometimes for several seconds, with little or no sound forthcoming. Therapy for stuttering is usually offered on an individual or a group basis for a pre-defined period of time.
Stuttering also called onset fluency disorder is part of a cluster of diagnoses called communication disorders. Communication disorders are a group of psychiatric conditions that include:. Language includes the form, function, and use of a convention system of symbols i. Communication includes any verbal or nonverbal behavior that influences the behavior, ideas, or attitudes of another individual.