Sex in the 1800s

Duration: 7min 20sec Views: 1980 Submitted: 07.09.2019
Category: Fingering
The Victorian veneer of a straitlaced, prudish society was laid on only in the mids, when men were told sex was risky 'animal lust' and women were encouraged to forgo 'carnal passion' as beneath their proper role as mothers and homemakers, historian Jack Larkin wrote in an article published Monday. Records into the late s show premarital sex was widely accepted and 'pregnancy was frequently the prelude to marriage,' Larkin wrote. Unwed mothers customarily were interrogated during labor about the father, not out of concern over immorality but to force the father to support the child 'born a bastard and chargeable to the town,' he wrote, quoting a document of the era. A common custom before was 'bundling,' in which couples shared the same bed 'without undressing' and with 'the shared understanding that innocent endearments should not be exceeded,' according to a commentator of the era. Said Larkin, 'Folklore and local tradition, from Maine to south New York, had American mothers tucking bundling couples into bed with special chastity-protecting garments for the young woman or a 'bundling board' to separate them. However, 'if bundling had been intended to allow courting couples privacy and emotional intimacy but not sexual contact, it clearly failed,' he said.

Victoria and Albert Museum

Historian: Early Americans led lusty sex lives - UPI Archives

Imagine yourself as a young person during an era when there was no sex ed in high school. Sure, pornography exists, but you're more likely to get your hands on the smallpox virus than a properly illicit " French Postcard. And yet your wedding night approaches. How do you prepare yourself? Well, you'll read any number of delicately worded advice books, written by people of apparent high moral standing and usually vague medical credentials. A sampling:.

Sex secrets of the Victorian age - EXPOSED

This article is the first in a five-part series about experimental utopias. Do angels have sex? John Humphrey Noyes thought so. Related question: If they do the nasty in heaven, is it really so nasty after all? Noyes reasoned not.
What happened behind closed Victorian bedroom doors was a taboo subject. Among the uptight middle classes the prevailing attitude was that sex was necessary for reproduction but not something to be discussed in polite society — let alone enjoyed. Most brides arrived at their wedding night having not even the faintest idea about what was expected and many were simply terrified. Any guidance that existed on the subject of sex ranged from the peculiar to wide of the mark. It was claimed that having energetic intercourse more than once a month risked damaging the internal organs while a passionate session between the sheets after a meal could easily trigger a stroke.